Low carb, high protein diets linked to women’s heart disease – – CNN.com

You may have heard this report on the news this week, so I thought I’d put it up here in full.

If you read the last paragraph, you will see that it’s completely inconclusive, according to other experts.

I would just like to say though, I personally follow a low carb diet but I don’t eat an excessive amount of protein (eg. Fish, Meat, Cheese & Eggs) or loads of fat.  I like to think I have a normal amount. I also have low blood pressure for a middle-aged woman (120/70) and low cholesterol. So who knows. It might be a diet or hereditary thing.

More:

Low carb, high protein diets linked to women’s heart disease

Women who regularly cut back on carbohydrates and eat high amounts of protein are at increased risk of heart disease, concludes a study published Tuesday in the British Medical Journal.

To gauge the impact of the popular Atkins-style diets on women’s hearts, researchers in Greece turned to a food survey completed by more than 43,000 women in Sweden. The women, who were between 30 and 49 years old, recorded the frequency and quantities of food they ate over six months in 1991 and 1992.

Using the survey, researchers calculated which women were eating the least amount of carbohydrates and the most amount of protein. The women were then followed for 15 years on average to see who became diagnosed with cardiovascular disease. The women’s food habits were not tracked long-term but did provide researchers a snapshot in time.

The study found 1,270 women developed heart problems. The incidence of cardiovascular disease was 62% higher among women who consumed the least carbohydrates and the most protein, when compared to women who weren’t regularly eating a low carbohydrate, high protein diet. By eating such a diet, the researchers conclude an additional four to five women out of 10,000 develop cardiovascular disease each year.

The study found regularly eating just 20 fewer grams of carbohydrates and 5 more grams of protein a day increased the long-term risk of cardiovascular disease in women by 5%. That’s roughly the amount of carbohydrates in a small roll of whole grain bread and the amount of protein in one boiled egg.

Several large studies have had somewhat different conclusions.

In a statement, Atkins Nutritionals Inc. said the diet tested in the study was not the Atkins diet, and that the women in the study ate more carbohydrates and less protein than prescribed in the Atkins diet. The company said, “Studies done to date measuring the Atkins Diets’ effect on heart health have shown diminished risk.”

Nutrition experts who did not work on the study said its findings were in no way definitive.

“It’s provocative,” said Dr. Laurence Sperling, director of the Center for Heart Disease Prevention at Emory School of Medicine in Atlanta. “Yes, in this study there’s an association, but you need to be careful about taking that information and walking away with it and changing how you eat for the rest of your life.”

Post by: John Bonifield – CNN Medical Producer

Filed under: Diet and Fitness • Heart

via Low carb, high protein diets linked to women’s heart disease – – CNN.com Blogs.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *